Center for Biological Diversity calls for action to protect Oregon’s wolf population

The Center for Biological Diversity, which has staff in Portland, is urging people concerned about wolf protection in Oregon to attend an upcoming Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission hearing in Florence.

Five wolf pups from the Imnaha pack sip and sit at a pool of water July 7, 2013. The pups were about 2.5 months old in this remote camera photo. (Credit: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0)

Five wolf pups from the Imnaha pack sip and sit at a pool of water July 7, 2013. The pups were about 2.5 months old in this remote camera photo. (Credit: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife/Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0)

The commission will discuss the future of wolf recovery in the state at the Oct. 9 hearing. Under the state’s current wolf plan, wildlife officials can hold a review and decide whether to remove wolves from the state’s endangered species list once its wolf population reaches the benchmark of having four breeding pairs for three consecutive years.

Oregon’s wolf population recently reached that benchmark, but the center argues that its recovery is a long way off.

“A scientific habitat study has shown that the state could support nearly 1,400 more (wolves),” according to a center email.

The center is calling on Oregonians who are concerned about the state’s wolf  population and conservation to contact Oregon wildlife officials and urge them to continue protection.

For those who wish to attend the Oct. 9 hearing, the meeting will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 88146 First Ave. in Florence. For anyone wishing to give testimony at the hearing, the center is also offering a training session the day before in Eugene from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at 1247 Willamette St.

More information is available from the center online.

Susannah L. Bodman
Twitter: @Sciwhat
Facebook: Sciwhat.Science

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One Response to Center for Biological Diversity calls for action to protect Oregon’s wolf population

  1. Pingback: Wildlife commissioners nix Oregon wolves’ endangered species status | Science In Portland

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