Climate change concerns for Oregon’s Willamette Valley explored at Portland talk

Climate change is simultaneously a global and local concern, impacting even Oregon’s Willamette Valley.

What impacts should valley dwellers be concerned about and prepare for?

Despite Oregon's rainy reputation, climate change is having an impact on the region, including the Willamette Valley. Here, a rainy-day view of Portland's waterfront is shown from the tram platform at Oregon Health and Science University. Susannah L. Bodman

Despite Oregon’s rainy reputation, climate change is having an impact on the region, including the Willamette Valley. Here, a rainy-day view of Portland’s waterfront is shown from the tram platform at Oregon Health and Science University. Susannah L. Bodman

“Climate Change and the Willamette Valley: The fears. The possibilities. The necessities,” a presentation of the University of Oregon John Yeon Center for Architecture and the Landscape, will explore the issue from 2 to 5 p.m. Oct. 11 at the UO’s Portland campus, 70 N.W. Couch St.

The presentation will feature four panelists, described as “leading thinkers on the Willamette Valley and its future” on the event’s Facebook page:

• Pam Wiley, director of Meyer Memorial Trust’s Willamette River Initiative
• David Hulse, UO landscape professor and co-author of Willamette River Basin Planning Atlas
• Mike Houck, urban naturalist, Portland planning commissioner and founder of  Urban Greenspaces Institute
• John Miller, president and owner of Wildwood/Mahonia, a family of companies involved in nursery, wine, planning and development

They’ll ponder what lies ahead for the valley — which not only is Oregon’s primary population center but also full of farmland, natural landscapes and recreational sites — and how a warming climate is already impacting the region.

Moderator for the panel will be Yeon Center director Randy Gragg, who will guide the conversation through an exploration of research, the state of existing climate-related programs and what initiatives may be needed to steer a warmer, increasingly populous valley toward healthy ecosystems, urban and rural populations, and industries.

There is a suggested donation of $10 to attend the event.

For reservations and more information, email johnyeon.rsvp@gmail.com or check out the event’s Facebook page.

Susannah L. Bodman
Twitter: @Sciwhat
Facebook: Sciwhat.Science

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