Giddy-on-up for Portland State talk on archaeology and the horse culture of ancient Britain

Here in the remnants of the wild, wild West, horses can conjure up historical imagery and a little modern affinity for those who still like to explore the outdoors by hoof and trail.

Horses, too, played a key role in the culture and identity of people in Britain in the first millennium AD.

The partnership between humans and horses started thousands of years ago with domestication, likely on the steppes of Eurasia. (From The New York Public Library's public domain collection; circa 1817-18, Henry Thomas Alken, engraver)

The partnership between humans and horses started thousands of years ago with domestication, likely on the wind-swept steppes of Eurasia.
(From The New York Public Library’s public domain collection; circa 1817-18, Henry Thomas Alken, engraver)

On this topic, bioarchaeologist Pamela Cross will present a talk Jan. 14 as part of Portland State University Anthropology’s First Thursday lecture series.

Cross will discuss the remains of horses from archaeological sites and the people of Europe’s Dark Ages, exploring what the bones of old horses can tell us about living horses and their relationships with humans as well as how changing horse rituals in Britain may have signaled changing cultural identities and influenced myths and folklore that reach into our modern world.

Cross’ presentation will begin at 4 p.m. in Room 298, Smith Memorial Student Union, PSU campus. It’s free and open to the public.

For more information, go to the event’s web page or contact PSU’s Anthropology Department.

Susannah L. Bodman
Twitter: @Sciwhat
Facebook: Sciwhat.Science

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